Year 10 Curriculum

English

The GCSE English course is a combination of Controlled Assessments and final examination.

In English, students study a range of language and literature topics aimed at developing their written and verbal communication skills as well as their ability to think critically and logically, and be creative.

There are Controlled Assessments on a range of creative texts of different genres (drama, poetry and prose) that will include work by Shakespeare, pre-1914 texts and work from a different culture or tradition.   In addition to this, students will produce their own texts that develop their creative writing skills.   All of these Controlled Assessments will add up to 40% of the final grade.  The remaining 60% is tested in the final examination in which students demonstrate their ability to understand and produce non-fiction texts.

Speaking and Listening will remain an important component of the course but will now be accredited with a certificate separate from the GCSEs. 

  • Autumn Term Understanding Creative Texts: prose text from a different culture (controlled assessment) Introduction to GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ (exam preparation) Producing Creative Texts (controlled assessment)
  • Summer Term Understanding Creative Texts: a play by Shakespeare (controlled assessment) Producing Creative Texts (controlled assessment)
  • Summer Term GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ (exam preparation)

English Language and Literature

The GCSE Language and Literature course is a combination of Controlled Assessments and final examination. In the dual Language and Literature course, students study both classic and contemporary literature as well as a range of language topics aimed at developing their written and verbal communication skills, their ability to think critically and logically, and be creative.   There are Controlled Assessments on Shakespeare and the Literary Heritage; the novel; as well as Creative Writing and Spoken Language Study.   The Controlled Assessments represent 40% of the Language GCSE and 25% of the Literature GCSE. The remaining 60% of the Language GCSE is tested in the final examination in which students demonstrate their ability to understand and produce non-fiction texts.  In the two Literature exams (the remaining 75% of the Literature GCSE), students respond to modern drama and prose, as well as the Poetry Across Time unit.

Speaking and Listening will remain an important component of the course but will now be accredited with a certificate separate from the GCSEs. 

  • Autumn Term Prose Text (from a different culture): studied for both exam and controlled assessment Introduction to GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ Creative Writing: controlled assessment
  • Summer Term Shakespeare and the English Literary Heritage: a work by Shakespeare is studied alongside a text from a prescribed list of authors leading to a controlled assessment Spoken Language Study: controlled assessment
  • Summer Term ‘Poetry Across Time’: exam preparation Creative Writing: controlled assessment GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ exam preparation

Mathematics

All students follow the National Secondary Strategy for Mathematics and the relevant key objectives. The Framework identifies yearly learning objectives that encourage ambition and provide challenge for all students, showing progression in the subject. The objectives ensure full coverage of the programme of study for the Key Stage 4 National Curriculum for Mathematics. All students have access to the 5 strands in the Framework for Mathematics within the Secondary Strategy:

  • Mathematical processes and applications
  • Number
  • Algebra
  • Geometry and Measures
  • Statistics

Students are set according to ability with differentiation occurring across the ability groups and within each set. The material covered depends largely on the tier of entry for the final assessment but both tiers cover elements of Functional Mathematics. This ensures that students have the skills needed to use Mathematics in real life contexts. Students are encouraged to develop an understanding of the relevance of Mathematics in the real world. Christ the King College follows the Edexcel Examination Scheme at GCSE. Depending on ability, students follow either the Foundation or Higher course. All courses provide students with stimulating, demanding and enjoyable Mathematics appropriate to their ability. To help to ensure that students are meeting their expected targets, each student will sit an assessment at the end of each half term. Assessments will be used to determine both setting and to highlight areas where students require more focus. 

Triple Science

Students sit their GCSE’s in Biology and Chemistry at the end of year 10. All students will be examined in May/June. Coursework will also be submitted in May and it is vital that the highest possible marks are achieved. Opportunities for working on examination technique and coursework improvement are offered after school from January onwards. This course commenced in year 9 when the first units of Biology and Chemistry were studied. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area. 

  • Autumn Term Students will study aspects of Chemistry and Biology. Further opportunities to undertake coursework will also be given to ensure that all students have the opportunity to achieve the highest grades possible.
  • Summer Term Students will continue to study Biology and there will be opportunities to complete project work to strengthen their analytic skills. Revision sessions will commence and examination technique will play a major role in progressive assessment in order to raise grades.
  • Summer term Students will complete both the Biology and Chemistry courses and intensive revision will continue. Students will complete and submit their coursework as well as fine tuning their examination preparation to aid the improvement of examination grades.

Double Science

Students are studying Core Science which is the first of their GCSE Double Science courses. This course comprises of two separate GCSE’s of which the Core Science will be examined at the end of year 10. Students are studying components of Biology, Chemistry (year 9) and Physics (year 10). Students will also prepare coursework which equates to a quarter of this Core Science course. Students will prepare for sitting the examinations in May/June.

Opportunities for working on examination technique and coursework improvement are offered after school on a regular basis. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area.

  • Autumn Term  Students will study Physics and alongside the examination technique skills, coursework will be developed. After school Biology revision classes will commence.
  • Summer Term Students will revise the Biology and Chemistry they studied in year 9 and there will be opportunities to undertake project work. Revision sessions will be on going and examination technique will play a major role in progressive assessment in order to raise grades. Students will have an opportunity to improve their coursework.
  • Summer term Students will revise all Biology, Chemistry and Physics units and intensive revision will commence. Students will complete and submit their coursework as well as fine tuning their examination preparation to aid the improvement of examination grades.

BTEC Science

Students are in the final year of their BTEC GCSE Science course. The course has an emphasis on relating the applications of Science in the workplace with aspects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. This course began in year 9.

Students are studying units 4-6 this year and together with units 1-3 completed in Year 9, students will have completed the Applied Science (NQF) Extended Certificate for award in June.

Opportunities for working on examination technique and improvement of assignments are offered after school on a regular basis. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area.

  • Autumn Term  Students will study chemical applications and a practical assignment will be completed. 
  • Summer Term Students will study Applied Physics and a practical assignment will be completed.
  • Summer term Students will study Health Applications and a practical assignment will be completed.  

Religious Education

Autumn Term Believing in God: Students have the opportunity to explore the types of things that lead some people to believe in God and other things that lead to people questioning God’s existence. Religion and Community cohesion: Students look at how society’s norms have changed over the last 100 years.  Students investigate different Christian beliefs on the roles of women in the UK, Christian attitudes to multi-ethnic Britain and ways in which to promote community cohesion.

Spring Term Matters of life and death: Students discuss issues surrounding life after death and examine why some people believe in the afterlife and others do not, including issues around abortion and euthanasia. Marriage and the Family:  Students examine the UK’s changing attitude to marriage and family life and how legislation has changed on the definition of marriage.  Students also explore different Christian attitudes to homosexuality, contraception and where a Christian family may go for support.

Summer Term Students revise and sit a mock exam based on the previous year’s teachings of the Religion and Life with Christianity course. Students then start Topic 1 of the GCSE course in Religion and Society.  Rights and responsibility: Students look at the ways Christians work out how to make moral decisions based on the range of moral authorities available to them.

Core Physical Education

Autumn Term Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Cross Country, Invasion Games, Fitness for Life, Trampolining/Suppleness and Leadership Skills/OAA.

Summer Term Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Cycling/Mountain Biking, Trampolining/Suppleness, Fitness – Cardio Vascular, Dance, Tennis and Volleyball.

Summer Term Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Athletics, Cricket, Softball, Tennis and Rounders. Assessment follows the National Curriculum and is an ongoing process with regular assessment throughout each lesson. 

History

The 2 year History GCSE allows students the opportunity to study History in a variety of ways - in depth, a study through time and within a local context. The College has chosen AQA as the examination board, using specification A. 

During Year 10, students will study ‘Medicine through Time’, from the Ancient World through to the present day. This includes the study of aspects of medicine including anatomy, public health and cause of disease and covers prehistory and the Egyptian, Greek, Medieval, Tudor and Victorian periods. In addition, the course focuses on factors that have influenced medical knowledge, such as religion and government.

In the summer term of Year 10, students begin the local study of an historic site, Carisbrooke Castle. This section of work includes fieldwork and is assessed by Controlled Assessment where students answer examination questions in their lessons, under examination conditions.  In Year 11, students study a narrower period of History in depth, external examinations for both Medicine and the depth study take place at the end of Year 11. Ancient History

Ancient History GCSE provides an introduction to the ancient world. The GCSE units are: 

Unit A031: The Greeks at war

  • Option 1: The Greeks defend themselves, 499–479 BC
  • Option 2: Alexander the Great: 356–323 BC 

Unit A032: The rise of Rome

  • Option 1: The origins of Rome: The kings 753–508 BC
  • Option 2: Hannibal’s invasion and defeat, 218–146 BC 

Unit A033: Women in ancient politics

  • Option 1: Cleopatra and her impact on Roman politics, 69–30 BC
  • Option 2: Agrippina the Younger and her influence on Roman politics, AD 41–59

Unit A034: Ancient societies through the study of original sources

  • Option 1: Ancient Egypt 3000–1000 BC
  • Option 2: Ancient Crete: Minoan civilisation 2000–1400 BC
  • Option 3: Troy and the Mycenaeans 1450–1100 BC
  • Option 4: Ancient Persia 630–499 BC
  • Option 5: The Hellenistic world 323–133 BC
  • Option 6: The Celts c. 500 BC–AD 500 

In Year 10, the students study Unit A031 and also Unit A032:

In Year 11, the students study Unit A033 and also Unit A034 Unit A034 is assessed by Controlled Assessment where students answer examination questions in their lessons, under examination conditions.

Geography

Students are studying AQA Geography B.  There are two examined units worth 37.5% of the final grade each, and two pieces of work under Controlled Assessment: one field work based worth 15% and one research based, worth 10%.

  • Autumn Term Managing places in the 21st Century:- The coastal environment and the urban environment.  This unit covers the physical processes that affect the coast and the human response to the threat of erosion and how living in urban areas is the future for people all over the world and how their lives can be made better.
  • Spring Living with natural hazards - This section of the curriculum covers tropical storms, volcanoes, earthquakes and wild fires; Causes, effects, human responses. Case studies are an important feature of this unit.
  • Summer Term In Year 10 students will finish the unit on Natural Hazards. They will then be preparing for, then undertaking the field work, which will lead beginning to present the data gathered on the field trip. 

French

In Year 10, students cover two of the four GCSE Contexts, each of which is divided into two purposes.  They have a Controlled Assessment Task on each of the four purposes they cover this year: three speaking tasks, in October, December and February; and two writing tasks, in March/April and June.  The purposes covered this year are:

  • Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles and their consequences (diet, smoking, alcohol and drugs)
  • Relationships and social issues (marriage, discrimination, poverty and charity)
  • Leisure (shopping, fashion trends, advantages and disadvantages of new technology)
  • Holidays and travelling (destinations, festivals, plans and special occasions)

Students have the opportunity to develop their listening, reading and writing skills and are able to practise their speaking regularly in small group work.  They are encouraged to make use of the textbook at home, and the online exercises and guidance.  

In Year 10, students cover two of the four GCSE Contexts, each of which is divided into two purposes.  They have a Controlled Assessment Task on each of the four purposes they cover this year: three speaking tasks, in October, December and February; and two writing tasks, in March/April and June.  The purposes covered this year are:

  • Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles and their consequences (diet, smoking, alcohol and drugs)
  • Relationships and social issues (marriage, discrimination, poverty and charity)
  • Leisure (shopping, fashion trends, advantages and disadvantages of new technology)
  • Holidays and travelling (destinations, festivals, plans and special occasions)

Students have the opportunity to develop their listening, reading and writing skills and are able to practise their speaking regularly in small group work.  They are encouraged to make use of the textbook at home, and the online exercises and guidance.

Latin

In Year 10 Latin students study Books I and II of the Cambridge Latin Course. In Year 11 they will continue with the Cambridge Latin Course in order to achieve Level 2 Latin Language & Roman Civilisation by the end of Key Stage 4. We will also begin studying a selection of Latin Literature with the aim of achieving Level 2 Latin Literature at the end of Key Stage 4.

Autumn Term Latin Language: Students commence/revise Book I and receive an introduction to Latin grammar. SpringTerm Latin Language: Students continue to build on their language skills, completing Book I and beginning Book II

Summer Term Students prepare for their Level 1 examinations in Latin Language and Roman Civilisation and/or Latin Literature. We also continue with Book II. Latin Literature: We look at a range of Latin verse based on Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Woodcraft

NCFE level 2 Certificate in Creative Crafts with Wood This qualification aims to extend and further develop learners’ craft skills in a chosen craft area (working with wood). The qualification further develops learners with underpinning knowledge of the craft process and Health and Safety issues which gives them the basis for progression onto further study. 

Students will learn to:

  • effectively use materials, tools and resources to develop wood crafts techniques
  • Develop and adapt wood crafts ideas creatively
  • Create, present and evaluate final wood crafts item(s)
  • Consider the financial and environmental implications of the products they create The course mainly consists of practical work supported by a design and theory folder and is assessed on the outcome of this practical and theory work.  It is 100% coursework assessed.

This year the students have completed a small chest, a photo or mirror frame, and they are currently exploring an up cycling project where the aim is to add maximum value to three pieces of pallet wood using cleaver and creative design.

Music

By the end of the academic year, students will have completed composing and performing coursework, as well as listening and appraising activities, and longer term projects, through the following areas of study:

  • Introduction to the course
  • Introduction to music theory
  • World music (1)
  • Popular music in context (1)
  • Western classical music 1600-1899
  • World music (2)

Assessment Coursework is assessed through completion and submission of Performing and Composing work under controlled conditions (supervised by the Teacher/Examiner) as follows:

  • Autumn Term 1: Solo Performance 1
  • Autumn Term 2: Composition 1
  • Summer term 1: Ensemble Performance 1; Composition 2
  • Summer term 2: Composition 3
  • Summer term 1: Composition 4
  • Summer term 2: Solo Performance 2.

There will also be a 1 hour Listening exam at the end of Year 10.  This will not count towards the overall GCSE grade.

GCSE Physical Education

Throughout GCSE Physical Education students will be taught 4 units.  During Year 10 they will study the following units concurrently:

Unit B451: An Introduction to Physical Education 20% of total marks introduces candidates to Physical Education through three areas of study:

1. Key concepts in Physical Education 2. Key processes in Physical Education 3. Opportunities, pathways and participation in Physical Education.

The content in each of these areas of study will be externally assessed through written examination but is also relevant and applicable to the practical performances and analysis tasks undertaken in Units B452 and B454. Participation in physical activity and analysis of performance should provide candidates with opportunities for their knowledge and skills to be developed and real experiences which they can use as examples to demonstrate and apply their understanding.

This module concentrates on all theory aspects of Physical Education.  1 hour written paper taken in Summer 2015.

Unit B452: Practical Performance and Analysis 1 30% of total marks  Students participate in a wide variety of GCSE activities.  Assessment for this unit will be an ongoing process with final assessment in Summer 2014.  They will complete two practical performances from two different activity areas. There will be a Controlled Assessment task in Summer 2014.

In Year 11 students will study theory Unit B453 and Practical Development in Unit B454. Both the B451 and the B453 examinations will be taken in summer 2015.  

BTEC Sport

Curriculum Guide 2013/14 Throughout Year 10 students will study the following units:

Autumn Term Unit 2: Practical Sport  This unit focuses on developing and improving your own practical sports performance. This is achieved through your active participation in practical activities and reflection on your own performance and that of other sports performers. This unit introduces you to a variety of different sports and, through participating in different sports, it is expected that you will develop knowledge of the associated rules, regulations, scoring systems, skills, techniques and tactics.

Summer and Summer Term Unit 4: The sports Performer in Action   Knowledge of the physiology of the body is useful for many careers in sport including roles in the fitness industry, which involves giving advice on training and lifestyle to the client. Learning aim A looks at the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems and how they function before, during, after training and over a length of time. Learning aim B looks at the energy systems for different sports activities. Assessment will be delivered through coursework.

Dance

Students will learn the principles of choreography and the use of stimuli to plan and perform their examination pieces. Through the two year course, students will also critically analyse professional dance works in order to develop their appreciation of dance.  Throughout GCSE Dance students will be taught 4 units.

Unit 1: Critical appreciation of dance 20% of total marks 1 hour written examination. Based on two professional works that will be studied over the two years.

Unit 2: Set Dance 20% of total marks Practical examination. Students perform one solo 1-1½ minutes, that is set by AQA, filmed and assessed externally.

Unit 3: Performance in a duo/group dance related to a set professional work 20% of the total marks Controlled Assessment.  Students perform in a dance for 2, 3, 4 or 5 dancers lasting 3-3½ minutes.  The key is performance skills in this unit.

Unit 4: Choreography Whole unit = 40% of total marks Controlled Assessment. A) Solo composition 15% Each student selects three motifs from one set professional work and develop into a solo dance of 1-1½ minutes.  Students can perform in their own composition. B) Choreography  25% Each student choreographs either a solo dance lasting 1½ -2 minutes or a group dance for 2, 3, 4 or 5 dancers, lasting 2½-3 minutes.  The dance may be in any style, in response to a stimulus from AQA.  Students can perform in their own choreography.  

BTEC Health and Social Care

BTEC Level 1/2 First Award in Health and Social Care This course provides a broad base for students with an interest in Health and Social Care.  During Year 10 students will complete two units:

Health and Social Care Values This unit promotes the understanding of key values in Health and Social Care and the importance of good practice to empower individuals.  This unit is assessed through a variety of written assignments.

Human Lifespan Development During this unit students will explore how people grow and develop throughout their lives and factors that affect this growth and development. This unit is assessed by a written exam in June 2014.

Drama

AQA GCSE. Students will explore a wide range of activities that are stimulating and creative, drawing from a variety of drama opportunities, including, acting set plays, devising their own work, creating physical theatre and seeing live theatre. Students will develop an analytical framework and the language to be able to understand and articulate how theatre is constructed and its effect on an audience. 

Written paper examination at the end of year 11. It comprises three sections: A – Practical work completed during the course B – Study and performance of a scripted play C – Study of a live theatre production seen

Controlled Assessments Practical. Throughout the year 10 and 11 course. Candidates are required to study at least two controlled assessment options from the following list: Devised Thematic Work, Acting, Improvisation, Theatre in Education, Physical Theatre, Set Design, Costume, Make-up, Properties, Masks, Puppets, Lighting, Sound and Stage Management. 

Candidates may choose two performance options, for example Acting and Devised Thematic Work; two design options, for example Costume and Make-up; two technical options, for example Sound and Lighting or one of each performance and design option, for example Costume and Acting.

Media Studies

Students have been following the AQA GCSE Media Studies specification, focusing on the four key concepts that underpin the subject: media language, audience, representation and institutions. Within this framework, students will complete two pieces of controlled assessment in Year 10.

In Year 11 students will undertake their third and final piece of controlled assessment in the Autumn Term. They will take an examination during the summer of 2014.

Fine Art

Students are following the AQA (Fine Art) syllabus. This course requires them to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They experience a range of techniques and media and use these to explore and develop personal themes and ideas.

The structure of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which is developed over two years and represents 60% of their marks. (ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which students undertake in the Summer Term of Year 11, which represents 40% of their marks.

Students work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons to support their learning and to facilitate more independent study.  Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives (which the students have copies of and will become increasingly familiar with).

Students have regular deadlines to produce specific pieces or units of work which are then assessed and feedback given. They then have the opportunity to refine and improve their work. There will be a deadline for all coursework for Year 11 where a final mark is given. 

Photography

Students are following the AQA (Photography) lens-based and light-based media syllabus. This course requires them to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They experience a range of techniques and processes and use these to explore and develop personal themes and ideas.

The structure of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which is developed over two years and represents 60% of their marks. (ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which students undertake in the Summer Term of Year 11, which represents 40% of their marks.

Students work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons to support their learning and to facilitate more independent study.  Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives (which the students have copies of and will become increasingly familiar with).

Students have regular deadlines to produce specific pieces or units of work which are then assessed and feedback given. They then have the opportunity to refine and improve their work. There will be a deadline for all coursework for Year 11 where a final mark is given. 

Graphic Communication

Students are following the AQA (Graphic Communication) syllabus. This course requires them to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They experience a range of techniques and processes and use these to explore and develop personal themes and ideas.

The assessment of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which is developed over two years and represents 60% of their marks. (ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which students undertake in the Summer Term of Year 11, which represents 40% of their marks.

Students work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons to support their learning and to facilitate more independent study.  Students’ work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives which the students have copies of and will become increasingly familiar with.

Students have regular deadlines to produce specific pieces or units of work which are then assessed and feedback given. They then have the opportunity to refine and improve their work. There will be a deadline for all coursework for Year 11 where a final mark will be given. 

Textiles

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are compliant to shaping such as wools, satin and silk etc. Students will be able to consider fashion and furnishings. However, they will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination. 

Product Design

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are resistant to shaping such as woods, metals and plastics and more compliant materials such as card, textiles and electronics. They will be able to consider a range of modern products such as phones, packaging and architecture. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination.

Resistant Materials

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are resistant to shaping such as woods, metals and plastics. They will consider Jewellery, storage and furniture etc. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11. Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination.

Child Development

WJEC Home Economics Child Development GCSE Course Child Development is a broad based course where students are given opportunities to develop and apply their skills, knowledge and understanding of the development and care of children from conception to the age of five years. 

There are six compulsory areas of study:

  • Family and Child
  • Food and Health
  • Pregnancy
  • Physical Development
  • Intellectual Development
  • Social Emotional Development

During Year 10, students will complete Child Study Controlled Assessment Tasks which carry a weighting of 30% of the total mark.  For this unit students are required to collect information and complete six hours of observations of a child.  The teaching is interwoven with time for the observations and the Controlled Assessment Tasks. 

During Year 11, students will complete Child Focused Controlled Assessment Tasks which carry a weighting of 30% of the total mark and a Written Paper which is an untiered paper and carries the remaining 40% of the marks.

Food Technology

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in a wide range of foods and food products, work can include the design and manufacture of meals, individual products, food packaging and food hygiene. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of year 11.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination. 

Business Studies

Unit 1 Investigating how businesses work (assessed by controlled assessment)

  • What is a business and what do businesses do?
  • How are businesses organised?
  • Why are stakeholders so important?

Unit 2: Financial Records (assessed by exam in Year 11)

  • Investigating the flow of financial documents used in business trading
  • Investigating business payment methods and costs
  • Investigating the nature of financial statements in business
  • Investigating the importance of financial statements to business

Subject to a good performance in Units 1 & 2 students will be entered for a double award GCSE in Year 11.  Any students with weaker performance will be required to focus on consolidating a single award.

BTEC Travel & Tourism

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Travel and Tourism   Throughout Year 10 the students will study the following units:

Autumn Term (Unit 1 External Exam) Unit 1:

The UK Travel and Tourism Sector – this unit covers the main types of  tourism in the UK, the contribution that travel and tourism makes to the UK  economy and the different component industries that make up the UK travel and tourism sector.

Spring Term and Summer Term (Unit 2 Internally Assessed Assignments) Unit 2:

UK Travel and Tourism Destinations – this unit covers what the different  types of UK destinations have to offer, as well as locating tourist UK destinations and routes.

Information Communication Technology

ICT is now considered by both Universities and Employers to be a core life skill. As some students may not be studying ICT as a GCSE, it is still important for students to be able to leave the College with some recognition of their ICT skills. Therefore all students will be working towards our own Christ the King ICT Award. This qualification will include all core skills including word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, email and databases. 

This qualification is our own award, there is no exam and it does not count as an actual GCSE qualification. However, this award is an excellent opportunity to add a certificate to your CV portfolio showing Colleges, Universities and potential employers that you have excellent skills in ICT.

Film Studies

How students are assessed For AS Level Film Studies, there are two units of assessment. Over the course of the year, students will develop a portfolio of coursework that demonstrates their knowledge and understanding, as well as their creativity and ability to work to a professional media brief. The two hour external exam, taken in May/June, will assess the student’s media textual analysis skills and their understanding of the concept of representation using a short unseen moving image extract.

The key areas of study The AS course consists of two units of work: FM1 – Exploring Film Form – 40% of AS – Coursework FM2 – British and American Film – 60% of AS – Exam

FM1 is a coursework unit consisting of one analysis of how the micro aspects (editing, sound, cinematography, lighting and mise-en-scene) of a chosen extract from a film of the student’s choice, produces meanings and responses (1500 words). This unit also consists of one creative project based on a film sequence or short film with an accompanying reflective analysis. This unit is internally assessed and externally moderated.

FM2 is an external two and a half hour examination paper which consists of three questions surrounding British and American film. The exam is split into three sections: response to stimulus material set by WJEC based on producers and audiences of film; topics in British Film; and a comparative study of two US films. This unit is externally examined. 

Computing

GCSE specifications in Computing should encourage students to be inspired, moved and challenged by following a coherent, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. They should help students to gain an insight into related sectors. They should prepare students to make informed decisions about further learning opportunities and career choices.

Unit A451Computer systems and programming: Computing Hardware, Software, and Representation of data in computer systems, Databases, Computer communications and networking and Programming

Unit A452 Practical Investigation: This unit is designed to provide students with an opportunity to carry out a practical investigation into a computing issue and engage them with computing in the real world.

Unit A453 Programming project: Students will need to create suitable algorithms which will provide a solution to the stated problem then code their solutions in a suitable programming language. The solutions must be tested at each stage to ensure they solve the stated problem using a suitable test plan with appropriate test data

Unit A451 Written paper – 40% of qualification Unit A452 Controlled assessment – 30% of qualification Unit A453 Controlled assessment – 30% of qualification

Citizenship

In Key Stage 4, students follow a programme of Citizenship and PSHE that supports students understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizens in a rapidly changing world today.  The curriculum at Christ the King College is further supported by the pastoral work of the class teacher, the daily act of collective worship where visiting speakers are a regular feature and annual fundraising for Charity.  Year 10 study AQA GCSE Citizenship.  By the end of Year 10 students should have completed two controlled assessments based on active Citizenship in the UK.

 

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