Year 11 Curriculum

English

The GCSE English course is a combination of Controlled Assessments and final examination.
In English, students study a range of language and literature topics aimed at developing their written and verbal communication skills as well as their ability to think critically and logically, and be creative. 

There are Controlled Assessments on a range of creative texts of different genres (drama, poetry and prose) that will include work by Shakespeare, pre-1914 texts and work from a different culture or tradition.   In addition to this, students will produce their own texts that develop their creative writing skills.   All of these Controlled Assessments will add up to 40% of the final grade.  The remaining 60% is tested in the final examination in which students demonstrate their ability to understand and produce non-fiction texts.

Speaking and Listening will remain an important component of the course but will now be accredited with a certificate separate from the GCSEs.

Autumn Term

Understanding Creative Texts: prose text from a different culture (controlled assessment)
Producing Creative Texts (controlled assessment)

Spring Term

Understanding Creative Texts (opportunity to retake controlled assessment)
Producing Creative Texts (opportunity to retake controlled assessment)

Summer Term

GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ (exam preparation)

Entry Level English and 
Entry Level Functional Skills English

Both of these qualifications are assessed by controlled assessment - no examinations are involved.

In Entry Level English, students have prepared for and then completed a series of units leading to controlled assessments, assessing either reading, writing or speaking & listening. The bulk of this work was completed in the Autumn term. Students are awarded Entry Level 3, 2 or 1 according to their level of attainment.

In Entry Level Functional Skills English, students are currently developing reading, writing and speaking & listening skills in preparation for controlled assessments which will be completed towards the end of the Spring term and early in the Summer term. These tasks and assessments are set with an eye to being relevant to the students in their lives outside of full-time education, challenging them to attempt tasks such as reading and understanding letters and emails, writing job applications and short letters/emails, and role play in a work-related situation.

English Language and Literature

The GCSE Language and Literature course is a combination of Controlled Assessments and final examination.
In the dual Language and Literature course, students study both classic and contemporary literature as well as a range of language topics aimed at developing their written and verbal communication skills, their ability to think critically and logically, and be creative. 

There are Controlled Assessments on Shakespeare and the Literary Heritage; the novel; as well as Creative Writing and Spoken Language Study.   The Controlled Assessments represent 40% of the Language GCSE and 25% of the Literature GCSE.

The remaining 60% of the Language GCSE is tested in the final examination in which students demonstrate their ability to understand and produce non-fiction texts.  In the two Literature exams (the remaining 75% of the Literature GCSE), students respond to modern drama and prose, as well as the Poetry Across Time unit.

Speaking and Listening will remain an important component of the course but will now be accredited with a certificate separate from the GCSEs.

Autumn Term

Language: Spoken Language Study
Literature: Modern Prose/Drama Text

Spring Term

Literature Exam Preparation: ‘Poetry Across Time’ Anthology
Language/Literature: opportunity to retake controlled assessment
GCSE Unit 1: ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’ (exam preparation) 

Summer Term

Literature Exam Revision: Modern Prose/ Drama Text 
Literature Exam Revision: ‘Poetry Across Time’
Language Exam Revision: Unit 1 - ‘Reading and Producing Non-Fiction Texts’

IGCSE English Language and Edexcel KETO Literature

Edexcel KETO Literature certificate:
The English Literature course is 100% examination, with two external exams sat in January 2015. One exam covering drama and prose (60%) and another covering poetry (40%). 

The Edexcel KETO Certificate in English Literature requires students to demonstrate application and understanding of: 

  • prose, poetry and drama texts, and their contexts
  • the writers’ use of characterisation, theme, plot and setting 
  • the writers’ use of language to create literary effect 
  • own views and opinions of texts.

Cambridge IGCSE First Language English: 
On the Cambridge IGCSE First Language English course, learners develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively in both speech and writing. They learn how to employ a wide-ranging vocabulary, use correct grammar, spelling and punctuation, and develop a personal style and an awareness of the audience being addressed.
Students are also encouraged to read widely, both for their own enjoyment and to further their awareness of the ways in which English can be used. Cambridge IGCSE First Language English also develops more general analysis and communication skills such as synthesis, inference, and the ability to order facts and present opinions effectively.

Autumn Term

KETO Literature exam preparation on drama, prose and poetry - Of Mice and Men and An Inspector Calls, plus Poetry Anthology (100% exam)

Spring Term

KETO Literature examinations – January 8th and 21st
IGCSE English Language Coursework (40%):

•    Assignment 1: informative, analytical and/or argumentative 
•    Assignment 2: descriptive and/or narrative 
•    Assignment 3: a response to a text or texts of approximately two sides of A4 in total

Summer Term

iGCSE Language preparation for exam (40%)
Speaking and Listening examination - recorded (20%)

Mathematics

All students follow the National Secondary Strategy for Mathematics and the relevant key objectives. The Framework identifies yearly learning objectives that encourage ambition and provide challenge for all students, showing progression in the subject. The objectives ensure full coverage of the programme of study for the Key Stage 4 National Curriculum for Mathematics.
 
Students are set according to ability with differentiation occurring across the ability groups, but also within each set. The material covered depends largely on the tier of entry for the final assessment, but both tiers cover elements of Functional Mathematics. This ensures that students have the skills needed to use Mathematics in real life contexts. Students are encouraged to develop an understanding of the relevance of Mathematics in the real world.
 
Students are entered at either the Foundation or Higher tier.  There is no controlled assessment or coursework component to the Mathematics GCSE, instead assessment takes the form of two terminal examinations, the first one is a non-calculator paper and the second a calculator paper.  

Christ the King College follows the Edexcel Examination Scheme at both Foundation and Higher tiers.

All courses provide students with stimulating, demanding and enjoyable Mathematics appropriate to their ability.

Physics

Students sat their GCSE’s in Biology and Chemistry in Year 10. All students are now studying their final GCSE in Physics which will be examined in May/June. Coursework will also be submitted in May and it is vital that the highest possible marks are achieved. Opportunities for working on examination technique and coursework improvement are offered after school from January onwards. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area. 

Autumn Term

Students will study aspects of Physics including energy, waves and forces. Further opportunities to undertake coursework will also be given.

Spring Term

Students will continue to study mechanics, electricity to a higher level and the formation and lifecycle of stars. They progress to study applications of Physics including Medical physics and hazards of radioactive waste. Revision sessions will commence after half term and examination technique will play a major role in progressive assessment in order to raise grades.

Summer Term

Students will complete the Physics P3 course and intensive revision will continue. Students will complete and submit their controlled assessment as well as fine tuning their examination preparation to aid the improvement of examination grades.

Additional Science

Students are in the final year of their GCSE Double Science course. This course is comprised of two separate GCSE’s of which the Core Science has already been sat at the end of year 10. Students are now working to complete their second GCSE, Additional Science which includes components of Biology, Chemistry and Physics, we refer to these modules as B2, C2 and P2 respectively. Students will be preparing for the final examinations in May and June as well as undertaking further coursework to improve their overall grade. 

Opportunities for working on examination technique and coursework improvement are offered after school on a regular basis. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area.

Autumn Term

Students will study Chemistry and Physics and alongside the examination technique skills, coursework will be developed. 

Spring Term

Students will continue to study Physics and progress to study Biology. Revision sessions will be on going and examination technique will play a major role in progressive assessment in order to raise grades.

Summer Term

Students will complete Biology and intensive revision will commence. Students will complete and submit their coursework as well as fine tuning their examination preparation to aid the improvement of examination grades.

Additional Applied Science

Students are in the final year of their GCSE Double Science course. This course is comprised of two separate GCSE’s of which the Core Science has already been sat at the end of year 10. Students are now working to complete their second GCSE, Additional Applied Science which includes components of Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students will be preparing for the final examination in May.

The course is split between 1 examination in May and 2 assignments that relate applications of Science in the workplace. This course began in September of this year to give the maximum opportunity for the coursework components to be completed and implement any intervention that may be required.

Opportunities for working on examination technique and coursework improvement are offered after half term and students are encouraged to attend these sessions. All students can access complete sets of Oxford University Press resources in the student area.

Autumn Term

Students will study aspects of Biology, farming and the food industry. A practice assignment will be completed and the first of the 2 real assignments. Alongside the examination technique skills, an in depth understanding of Science in society will be developed. Students attend an Organic farming field trip.

Spring Term

Students will study applications of Chemistry in analytic industries and progress to gain an understanding of Materials Science. The second assignment will be completed. Revision sessions will commence and examination technique will play a major role in progressive assessment in order to raise grades.

Summer Term

Students will complete and submit their assignments as well as fine tuning their examination preparation to aid the improvement of examination grades. All aspects of Science will be revised.

Religious Education

Year 11 study a GCSE course in Religion and Society and revise Religion and Life from year 10.

Autumn Term

Rights and responsibilities: Students investigate the difference between rights and responsibilities and how moral decisions are made. Students also reflect on Christian approaches to making moral decisions including the study of genetic engineering and democracy.

Crime and Punishment:  Students review the need of law and justice and what different religious views of law and justice are.  Research will be undertaken on different forms of punishment such as imprisonment and capital punishment.

Spring Term

Environmental and medical influences: Students reflect on different religious approaches to global warming, pollution, renewable resources, infertility treatments and transplant surgery.

Peace and Conflict: Students investigate different international organisation and their role in promoting peace in the world.  Students also examine different Christian and Jewish attitudes to conflict such as war, bullying, family conflict.  Students reflect on remedies to these situations such as forgiveness and reconciliation.

Summer Term

Students will revise and prepare for the GCSE exams that they will take in May 2015.

Core Physical Education

Autumn Term

Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Performing at maximum levels, Invasion Games, Fitness for Life, Trampolining/Suppleness and Leadership Skills/OAA.

Spring Term

Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Cycling/Mountain Biking, Trampolining/Suppleness, Fitness – Cardio Vascular, Dance, Tennis, Volleyball and Table Tennis.

Summer Term

Students are taught a selection of activities from the following: Athletics, Cricket, Softball, Tennis, Rounders and Cycling.

Assessment follows the National Curriculum and is an on-going process with regular assessment throughout each lesson. 

History

Students study Germany 1919-1945.  This topic looks at the political and economic challenges that faced the Weimar Republic after the First World War and then the development of totalitarianism and its impact on Germany.  By Year 11 students should have completed their controlled assessment and be regularly revising both their Medicine and Germany topics in preparation for both exams in the summer term.

Ancient History

Ancient History GCSE provides an introduction to the ancient world.  In Year 11, students study Units A033 and A034 as follows:  

Unit A033: Women in ancient politics 

  • Option 1: Cleopatra and her impact on Roman politics, 69–30 BC 
  • Option 2: Agrippina the Younger and her influence on Roman politics, AD 41–59

Unit A034: Ancient societies through the study of original sources 

  • Option 1: Ancient Egypt 3000–1000 BC 
  • Option 2: Ancient Crete: Minoan civilisation 2000–1400 BC 
  • Option 3: Troy and the Mycenaeans 1450–1100 BC 
  • Option 4: Ancient Persia 630–499 BC 
  • Option 5: The Hellenistic world 323–133 BC 
  • Option 6: The Celts c. 500 BC–AD 500 

Unit A034 is assessed by Controlled Assessment where students answer examination questions in their lessons, under examination conditions.

Geography

In Year 11, students studying for AQA syllabus B GCSE Geography need to complete two Controlled Assessments. 

Autumn Term

Complete the controlled assessment, Task 1 that is the Local Fieldwork Investigation worth 15% of the overall grade. Then start teaching the unit either ‘Energy in the 21st Century’ or ‘Water a precious resource’ to complete the Issues Investigation, worth 10% of the overall grade by Christmas. 

Spring Term

This term we will be studying the rest of the unit Hostile world and investigating the shrinking world we will study section B an investigation of global tourism, its growth impact and future developments.

Summer Term 

Revision of the four examined units and preparation and revision for the exams in June. 

French

In Year 11, students complete their study of the last two GCSE contexts.  They have two writing controlled assessment tasks in November and March. Students will be given the opportunity to improve on their speaking marks from year 10 during the year. Students also have external examinations in Reading and Listening in the Summer series 2015.
The sub-topics covered this year are:

  • Home and Local area
  • The environment
  • School/College and future plans
  • Current and future jobs

Students have the opportunity to develop their listening, reading and writing skills and are able to practise their speaking regularly in small group work. They are encouraged to make use of any worksheets and text books at home. 

Spanish

In Year 11, students complete their study of the last two GCSE contexts.  They have two writing controlled assessment tasks in November and March. Students will be given the opportunity to improve on their speaking marks from year 10 during the year. Students also have external examinations in Reading and Listening in the Summer series 2015.

The sub-topics covered this year are:

  • Home and Local area
  • The environment
  • School/College and future plans
  • Current and future jobs

Students have the opportunity to develop their listening, reading and writing skills and are able to practise their speaking regularly in small group work. They are encouraged to make use of any worksheets and text books at home. 

Latin

In Year 11 Latin students study Book III or IV of the Cambridge Latin Course. Those choosing to study Roman Civilisation will develop their understanding of the Roman Army; those choosing Further Latin Language will learn additional language and vocabulary. Both options will lead to a Level 2 qualification by the end of Key Stage 4. We are also studying a selection of Latin Literature with the aim of achieving Level 2 Latin Literature at the end of Year 11.
 

Autumn Term

Latin Language: students study Book III and/or IV.
The Roman Army: students studying Roman Civilisation will study the organisation of the Roman army and learn about the life of a Roman legionary.
Latin Literature: students develop their understanding of a range of Latin verse based on books and writers.

Spring Term

Latin Language: Book III and/or IV
The Roman Army: students studying Roman Civilisation will study the organisation of the Roman army and learn about the life of a Roman legionary.
Latin Literature: We study extracts from Books VIII and X of Ovid's Metamorphoses: the stories of Daedalus and Icarus and Pygmalion.

Summer Term

Students prepare for their Level 2 examinations in Latin Language and Roman Civilisation/Further Latin Language as well as Latin Literature.

Music

Exam Board and Specification: Edexcel/2MU01
By the end of the course, students will have completed composing and performing coursework, as well as listening and appraising activities, and longer term projects, through the following areas of study:

  • World music (2)
  • Popular music in context (2)
  • World music (3)
  • Music in the 20th century (2)

Assessment

Coursework is assessed through completion and submission of Performing and Composing work under controlled conditions (supervised by the Teacher/Examiner) as follows:

Autumn Term 1

Solo Performance 2/Composition 3

Autumn Term 2

Solo/Ensemble Performance coursework as required

Spring Term 1

Solo/Ensemble Performance coursework as required

Spring Term 2

Solo/Ensemble Performance and Composition coursework as required

Summer Term 1

Final recordings and preparation of Performing and Composing coursework ready for submission by the beginning of May; revision for the Listening Exam

Summer Term 2

Listening: there will be a 1 hour and 30 minute written paper. All questions relate to the set works; the paper will be in two sections: 

  • Section A: eight compulsory questions in response to extracts from the set works that will be played on a CD during the examination (68 marks).
  • Section B: one question from two optional questions on the set works, requiring extended writing (12 marks) - a total of 80 marks for the paper.

Physical Education

Throughout GCSE Physical Education students will be taught 4 units.  During Year 11 they will study the following units concurrently:

  • Unit B451: An Introduction to Physical Education 
  • Unit B453: Developing Knowledge in Physical Education 
  • Each of these units represent 20% of the total marks and concentrate on theory aspects of Physical Education.  A 1 hour written paper is taken in each during Summer 2015.
  • Unit B454: Practical Performance and Analysis 2 30% of total marks
  • Students participate in a wide variety of GCSE activities.  Assessment for this unit will be an ongoing process with final assessment in Spring 2015.  They will complete two practical performances from two different activity areas.  

There was another written Controlled Assessment task during Autumn 2014.

BTEC Sports Studies

Throughout Year 11 students will study the following units:

Autumn Term

Unit 5: Training for Personal Fitness
Within this unit learners will look at how to improve personal fitness and learn how to design a personal fitness training programme. Learning aim A takes you through the stages of designing a personal fitness training programme, where you can select any appropriate method(s) of training to improve or maintain your fitness levels safely. For learning aim B, you will gain awareness of personal exercise adherence factors and strategies, i.e. important knowledge to help you keep to your training schedule. For learning aim C, you will implement your personal fitness training programme, maintaining a training diary. Finally, for learning aim D you will review your programme looking at strengths, areas for improvement and suggesting recommendations for future training and performance

Spring and Summer Term

Unit 1: Fitness for Sport and Exercise (examination)
Fitness for sport and exercise is core to the programme of study. This unit has links to, and underpins, the other units for sport. In learning aim A you will cover the components of physical and skill-related fitness and the principles of training. Learning aim B explores different fitness training methods for developing components of fitness, and for learning aim C you will gain knowledge and skills in undertaking and administering fitness tests. This unit is particularly relevant if you would like to work in sports coaching, elite sport or personal training.

Dance

Students will continue to learn the principles of choreography enhancing their understanding from Year 10.  Students will continue to develop their examination pieces ready for moderation in March/April.  Through the year, students will critically analyse professional dance works in order to develop their appreciation of dance.

Throughout GCSE Dance students will be taught 4 units.
Unit 1: Critical appreciation of dance 20% of total marks
Unit 2: Set Dance 20% of total marks
Unit 3: Performance in a duo/group dance related to a set professional work 20% of the total marks
Unit 4: Choreography Whole unit = 40% of total marks
A)    Solo composition 15%
B)    Choreography  25%

BTEC Health and Social Care

Level 2 Award in Health and Social Care

Students will complete the final two units required for this course.

Unit 2: Health and Social care values
Students will explore the care values that underpin current practice in health and social care. The will also investigate ways of empowering individuals who use health and social care services. Assessment will be carried out throughout written tasks.

Unit 6: The impact of Nutrition on Health and Wellbeing
Students will explore the effects of balanced and unbalanced diets on the health and wellbeing of individuals. They will also understand the specific nutritional needs and preferences of individuals. Assessment will be carried out throughout written tasks.

Drama

In AQA GCSE Drama students will explore a wide range of activities that are stimulating and creative, drawing from a variety of drama opportunities, including, acting set plays, devising their own work, creating physical theatre and seeing live theatre. Students will develop an analytical framework and the language to be able to understand and articulate how theatre is constructed and its effect on an audience. 

Written paper examination at the end of Year 11. It comprises three sections: A – Practical work completed during the course, B – Study and performance of a scripted play, C – Study of a live theatre production seen.

Controlled Assessments Practical 
Throughout the two year course candidates are required to study at least two controlled assessment options from the following: Devised Thematic Work, Acting, Improvisation, Theatre in Education, Physical Theatre, Set Design, Costume, Make-up, Properties, Masks, Puppets, Lighting, Sound and Stage Management. Candidates may choose two performance options, for example Acting and Devised Thematic Work; two design options, for example Costume and Make-up; two technical options, for example Sound and Lighting or one of each performance and design option, for example Costume and Acting.

Media Studies

Students have been following the AQA GCSE Media Studies specification, focusing on the four key concepts that underpin the subject: media language, audience, representation and institutions. Within this framework, students have already completed two pieces of controlled assessment in Year 10 and are now in the final stages of completing their third and final piece. Students will also be preparing for their external examination which takes place in June 2015 on the topic of 'Television News'.

Fine Art

Students are following the AQA (Fine Art) syllabus. This year they will continue to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They will use a range of techniques and processes and explore and develop personal themes and ideas.  Students will work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons.

Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives which the students are familiar with.

The assessment of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which represents 60% of their marks.  The final deadline for their Coursework portfolio to be handed in for marking is in late December 2014.

(ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which represents 40% of their marks.  They will be given an exam question paper after Christmas and will select one theme.  They will undertake research and preparatory studies during the spring term and will produce their final outcome(s) during 10 hours of controlled assessment in late April/early May 2015.

Applied Art

Students are following the AQA (Applied Art) syllabus. This year they will continue to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They will use a range of techniques and processes and explore and develop personal themes and ideas.  Students will work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons.
 
Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives which the students are familiar with.
 
The assessment of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which represents 60% of their marks.  The final deadline for their Coursework portfolio to be handed in for marking is in late December 2014.

(ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which represents 40% of their marks.  They will be given an exam question paper after Christmas and will select one theme.  They will undertake research and preparatory studies during the spring term and will produce their final outcome(s) during 10 hours of controlled assessment in late April/early May 2015.

Photography

Students are following the AQA (Photography lens-based and light-based media) syllabus. This year they will continue to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They will use a range of techniques and processes and explore and develop personal themes and ideas.  Students will work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons.
 
Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives which the students are familiar with.
 
The assessment of the course is divided into two elements:

(i)    a portfolio of work which represents 60% of their marks.  The final deadline for their Coursework portfolio to be handed in for marking is in late December 2014.

an externally set task (set by the examination board) which represents 40% of their marks.  They will be given an exam question paper after Christmas and will select one theme.  They will undertake research and preparatory studies during the spring term and will produce their final outcome(s) during 10 hours of controlled assessment between late April/early May 2015.

Graphic Communication

Students are following the AQA (Graphic Communication) syllabus. This year they will continue to develop knowledge, understanding and skills through practical, critical and theoretical study. They will use a range of techniques and processes and explore and develop personal themes and ideas.  Students will work on a range of tasks in College and are expected to extend and develop their work outside of lessons.
 
Students work is assessed using four Assessment Objectives which the students are familiar with.
 
The assessment of the course is divided into two elements:

(i) a portfolio of work which represents 60% of their marks.  The final deadline for their Coursework portfolio to be handed in for marking is in late December 2014.

(ii) an externally set task (set by the examination board) which represents 40% of their marks.  They will be given an exam question paper after Christmas and will select one theme.  They will undertake research and preparatory studies during the spring term and will produce their final outcome(s) during 10 hours of controlled assessment in late April/early May 2015.

Textiles

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are compliant to shaping such as wools, satin and silk etc. Students will be able to consider fashion and furnishings and accessories. However, they will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

The specification, where possible, bridges the arts and the sciences combining theoretical knowledge and understanding with practical and creative skills to solve real problems.

Familiarity with design methodology, a variety of materials and components and processes is required as well as consideration for peoples’ needs and the importance of sustainability.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination. The examination will take place during May/June in 2015. (Exact date to be confirmed.)

Product Design

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are resistant to shaping such as woods, metals and plastics and more compliant materials such as card, textiles and electronics. They will be able to consider a range of modern products such as phones, packaging and architecture. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

The specification, where possible, bridges the arts and the sciences combining theoretical knowledge and understanding with practical and creative skills to solve real problems.

Familiarity with design methodology, a variety of materials and components and processes is required as well as consideration for peoples’ needs and the importance of sustainability.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination. The examination will take place during May/June in 2015. (Exact date to be confirmed.)

Resistant Materials

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in materials that are resistant to shaping such as woods, metals and plastics. They will consider Jewellery, storage and furniture etc. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

The specification, where possible, bridges the arts and the sciences combining theoretical knowledge and understanding with practical and creative skills to solve real problems.

Familiarity with design methodology, a variety of materials and components and processes is required as well as consideration for peoples’ needs and the importance of sustainability.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

During Year 11 students will complete a Controlled Assessment Task which carries a weighting of 60% of the total mark. The task includes an analysis of a problem, the writing of a design specification, the generation of a range of ideas, development of a final solution and the production of the details of the final solution. Students will then plan the making process, carry out the making and evaluate the project. This task will then take place over a focussed 30 hour period of time.

The remaining 40% of the marks is earned by the completion of a written examination. The examination will take place during May/June in 2015. (Exact date to be confirmed.)

Child Development

Child Development is a broad based course where students are given opportunities to develop and apply their skills, knowledge and understanding of the development and care of children from conception to the age of five years. 

The specification promotes an understanding of the social, emotional, physical and intellectual development of the child which is interlinked through the study of the family, community and responsibilities of parenthood.

Students are required to complete a variety of activities and tasks, through which they have the opportunity to develop their design and technologies capability whilst extending imaginative, innovative thinking, creativity and interdependence relating to their personal interests.

There are six compulsory areas of study:

  • Family and Child
  • Food and Health
  • Pregnancy
  • Physical Development
  • Intellectual Development
  • Social Emotional Development

During Year 11, students will complete Child Focused Controlled Assessment Tasks which carry a weighting of 30% of the total mark and a Written Paper which is a non-tiered paper and carries the remaining 40% of the marks.

In undertaking the Controlled Assessment Tasks students will have the opportunity to develop and use a wide range of skills:

  • Carrying out well focused and relevant investigational work using appropriate skills
  • Recording and analysis of evidence
  • Evaluating the evidence and offering reasoned judgements with conclusions

Food Technology

Design and Technology is a broad based course where students are required to complete a wide range of activities and tasks in their chosen specialism. The main framework of the course is based around design and make project work in a wide range of foods and food products, work can include the design and manufacture of meals, individual products, food packaging and food hygiene. However, students will also cover theory and will complete a series of short focussed activities, enabling them to acquire and develop new skills and knowledge ready for the demands of Year 11.

The specification, where possible, bridges the arts and the sciences combining theoretical knowledge and understanding with practical and creative skills to solve real problems.

Familiarity with design methodology, a variety of materials and components and processes is required as well as consideration for peoples’ needs and the importance of sustainability.

Work is assessed using a selection of the activities mentioned above and in line with the examination board requirements, under the headings of:

  • Designing
  • Making
  • Knowledge and understanding

Business Studies

In Year 11 students cover two units:

Unit 3 Investigating People, Business & Change (assessed by controlled assessment)

  • Why are people important?
  • How do businesses develop?
  • What are external factors?

Unit 4 Financial Planning & Forecasting ((assessed by final exam)

  • Investigating cash flow forecasts
  • Investigating budgets
  • Investigating break even analysis
  • Investigating sources of finance and financial planning

BTEC Travel & Tourism

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Travel and Tourism
 
Throughout Year 11 the students will study the following units:

Autumn Term

Unit 4: International Travel and Tourism Destinations – this unit looks at international travel and tourism destinations and gateways and reasons for their appeal to different visitors. Students will also be preparing for the Unit 1 external exam during this term. 

Spring Term

Unit 5: Factors Affecting Worldwide Travel and Tourism – this unit covers the influential factors on tourism and why events such as natural disasters can have a significant impact on the sector.  

Summer Term

During the summer term we will review the course content and complete sections of Unit 5. 

Information and Communication Technology

All students are continuing their progress towards the WJEC Information and Communication Technology single award GCSE. This qualification is split into four modules:

  • Module 1 – Understanding ICT
  • Module 2 – Solving problems with ICT
  • Module 3 – ICT in Organisations
  • Module 4 – Developing Multimedia ICT Solutions

The weighting of the qualification is 60% coursework and 40% exam, with both exams being taken in the summer at the end of their course. During this year students will spend much of their time working on their Module 4 piece of coursework. This coursework is context based, with a real life scenario used to help students then create ICT solutions. This year students will have to build their own ICT system ready to solve the real life style scenario. All remaining time will be dedicated to practicing theory for Module 1 and Module 3.

Woodcraft

NCFE level 2 Certificate in Creative Crafts with Wood
This qualification aims to extend and further develop learners’ craft skills in a chosen craft area (working with wood). The qualification further develops learners with underpinning knowledge of the craft process and Health and Safety issues which gives them the basis for progression onto further study. 
Students will learn to:

  • effectively use materials, tools and resources to develop wood crafts techniques 
  • Develop and adapt wood crafts ideas creatively
  • Create, present and evaluate final wood crafts item(s)
  • Consider the financial and environmental implications of the products they create

The course mainly consists of practical work supported by a design and theory folder and is assessed on the outcome of this practical and theory work.  It is 100% coursework assessed.

This year the students have completed a small chest, a photo or mirror frame, and they are currently exploring an up cycling project where the aim is to add maximum value to three pieces of pallet wood using cleaver and creative design.

© Christ the King College, 2017